2017 F1 Fuel Changes

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Read here. They will have to commit to only five blends per season, two per weekend, not unlimited any longer. A few things in the article will be of interest to the BITOG crowd. Semi-off topic, Bernie may be "gone" very shortly. They have spoken of awarding him a title of "President for Life" or something like that, which seems rather fitting. wink It's only semi-off topic, because when Bernie's gone, it'll be interesting to see who people will scapegoat for the rules and complexity that Bernie opposed in the first place.
 

JC1

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Originally Posted By: Garak
Read here. They will have to commit to only five blends per season, two per weekend, not unlimited any longer. A few things in the article will be of interest to the BITOG crowd. Semi-off topic, Bernie may be "gone" very shortly. They have spoken of awarding him a title of "President for Life" or something like that, which seems rather fitting. wink It's only semi-off topic, because when Bernie's gone, it'll be interesting to see who people will scapegoat for the rules and complexity that Bernie opposed in the first place.
I wonder what a gallon of that race fuel costs!
 
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It would be interesting to have the teams use the fuel obtained locally in their engines. A tanker truck arrives sometime in the week before the race weekend and fills up with the best fuel at a random fueling station within 50 miles of the track. The fuel has a chemical marker added for easy identification. Every team must obtain all their fuel from this truck over the weekend. This would put an end to the $25+/gallon race "gasoline" used in the current cars.
 

Garak

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Originally Posted By: JC1
I wonder what a gallon of that race fuel costs!
I suppose it depends how you look at it. From a materials standpoint, it's supposed to be something very, very similar to premium pump gasoline, with nothing exotic, and something like 99% the same as what we can get for our vehicles. Ferrari even did a demo with Shell a few years back with pump gas. So, from a materials standpoint, it's not expensive. From an R&D standpoint, with constant testing and formulation tweaking, plus the people involved in getting it done and the testing, it is probably very expensive. Vern: Ethanol blending is not prohibited at all, the technical regulations are here.
 
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