2016 F-150 3.5 EcoBoost 6,106 miles Castrol Edge EP mix

Joined
Jun 19, 2008
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71
Location
FL
This OCI was with 5qt of Castrol Edge EP 5w30 and 1qt of Castrol Edge 0w40. My goal with the mix was to beef up the viscosity just a bit since this motor is known to thin down oils with dilution and high heat. Looks like it worked compared to my last run of Castrol 5w30 (First UOA).
 

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Check your air filter!
Good looking out. But the filter is new, silicon is lingering from a warranty oil pan replacement. It's been steadily going down each OCI. Not causing excessive wear. Look how high it is on the run that had single digit iron. Was in multiple times towards the end of the extended warranty for a mystery seepage that turned out to be the oil pan. I think they went heavy on the RTV because of how many times it had been in. They didn't want to see me again. lol
 
Are you trying '2 quarts' of 0w40 now?
I might in the summer. It currently has Mobil 1 EPHM 5w30 in now. We'll see how that does for a FL winter run. Hoping the 5w can handle the blistering cold 60 degree FL morning starts. Might get a block warmer to be safe. 😜
 
This OCI was with 5qt of Castrol Edge EP 5w30 and 1qt of Castrol Edge 0w40. My goal with the mix was to beef up the viscosity just a bit since this motor is known to thin down oils with dilution and high heat. Looks like it worked compared to my last run of Castrol 5w30 (First UOA).
It is a good idea to use an oil with the appropriate viscosity and performance characteristics for your vehicle to ensure proper lubrication and protection of the engine. Mixing oils with different viscosities can be a way to tailor the oil's properties to the specific needs of your engine, and adding a bit of a thicker oil such as 0W-40 to a thinner oil like 5W-30 can help to increase the oil's viscosity and improve its ability to lubricate and protect the engine under high heat and high shear conditions. However, it is important to be careful when mixing oils and to ensure that the resulting blend meets the manufacturer's recommendations and any relevant industry standards or specifications. It is also a good idea to monitor the performance of the oil through regular oil analysis to ensure that it is providing sufficient protection to the engine.
 
It is a good idea to use an oil with the appropriate viscosity and performance characteristics for your vehicle to ensure proper lubrication and protection of the engine. Mixing oils with different viscosities can be a way to tailor the oil's properties to the specific needs of your engine, and adding a bit of a thicker oil such as 0W-40 to a thinner oil like 5W-30 can help to increase the oil's viscosity and improve its ability to lubricate and protect the engine under high heat and high shear conditions. However, it is important to be careful when mixing oils and to ensure that the resulting blend meets the manufacturer's recommendations and any relevant industry standards or specifications. It is also a good idea to monitor the performance of the oil through regular oil analysis to ensure that it is providing sufficient protection to the engine.
I could personally care less about the manufacturer's specifications. I run the oil that is most appropriate for the duty cycle and engine condition.
 
Thanks EcoBOOST, for your UOA’s…from a fellow Ecoboost 3.5 owner. Something I’ve been pondering is just how much of the old oil do we get out during a drain on these engines, and therefore, how much does the previous oil affect the sampled oil’s results? Too bad the previous Valvoline didn't float your boat, as it appeared you didn’t have to resort to un-natural acts to get an oil that stayed in grade with it. I’m jealous of your copper results, and shouldn’t comment on your Silicon, though in my case, on a Transit van, the air filter box is a disaster design, prone to clamp breakage and poor seating/sealing. That said, you appear to know the source of your Silicon.

now, if I could get @bfleeman to respond to my pvt message, since I think he also did some (Amsoil) 5w30 / 0w40 mixing….something I am strongly considering.

it sure would be nice if we could know or calculate the HTHS of these mixes.
 
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Thanks EcoBOOST, for your UOA’s…from a fellow Ecoboost 3.5 owner. Something I’ve been pondering is just how much of the old oil do we get out during a drain on these engines, and therefore, how much does the previous oil affect the sampled oil’s results? Too bad the previous Valvoline didn't float your boat, as it appeared you didn’t have to resort to un-natural acts to get an oil that stayed in grade with it. I’m jealous of your copper results, and shouldn’t comment on your Silicon, though in my case, on a Transit van, the air filter box is a disaster design, prone to clamp breakage and poor seating/sealing. That said, you appear to know the source of your Silicon.

now, if I could get @bfleeman to respond to my pvt message, since I think he also did some (Amsoil) 5w30 / 0w40 mixing….something I am strongly considering.

it sure would be nice if we could know or calculate the HTHS of these mixes.
Yes, overall the Castrol seems to do better with the copper for me and others I've seen on BITOG. Even with slight dilution/lower viscosity, it holds up well on the wear numbers. I'm not interested in longer runs. The only reason I went so long on the last two was there were a lot of highway miles on those from work travel. The first run was mostly city driving with a short 4 mile work commute, peak FL summer heat, off-roading and towing and it produced the lowest wear metals for me.
 
It is a good idea to use an oil with the appropriate viscosity and performance characteristics for your vehicle to ensure proper lubrication and protection of the engine. Mixing oils with different viscosities can be a way to tailor the oil's properties to the specific needs of your engine, and adding a bit of a thicker oil such as 0W-40 to a thinner oil like 5W-30 can help to increase the oil's viscosity and improve its ability to lubricate and protect the engine under high heat and high shear conditions. However, it is important to be careful when mixing oils and to ensure that the resulting blend meets the manufacturer's recommendations and any relevant industry standards or specifications. It is also a good idea to monitor the performance of the oil through regular oil analysis to ensure that it is providing sufficient protection to the engine.
Agreed, just wanted a small bump in visc to offset dilution induced thinning. Seemed to have worked for that purpose. A lot of guys on here run straight 0w40 with good results.
 
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