2015 Odyssey - 125K T-Belt and More

Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
12,270
Location
Phoenix
We chose a vehicle with a timing belt because for us, we wanted to stay with VW. They have a history of timing CHAIN issues, which cost thousands to replace all associated parts. VW moved to a belt for the 1.4 TSI due to ongoing issues with their chain design. No complaints from me. We will see how it holds up long term, but there are many 1.4 TSI's with over 150K on the original belt running just fine.

These aren't the same t-belts from the 90's that you replace every 60K.

Not really a concern for you since you trade for a new Jetta every 3k miles 😂
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 24, 2011
Messages
9,903
Location
North Carolina
Timing belts are the absolute worst, I'll never own another timing belt engine again unless it is non-interference. The only major repair I've ever had was a stupid timing belt failure...bearing on the idler pulley froze. Why buy something with a built in $1K repair early in the vehicle's life?
I'd rather have a timing belt with a scheduled replacement than a "maintenance free" chain.

There are random failures with both systems but with the timing belt you at least know it needs to be changed at a certain time.

With a timing chain, the lifetime is finite but undetermined. They're also more expensive to repair because they're not designed to be replaced as normal maintenance.

So instead of a $1500 belt job, you have a $4k+ chain job with the engine out. Or maybe not. But you might.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
12,270
Location
Phoenix
I'd rather have a timing belt with a scheduled replacement than a "maintenance free" chain.

There are random failures with both systems but with the timing belt you at least know it needs to be changed at a certain time.

With a timing chain, the lifetime is finite but undetermined. They're also more expensive to repair because they're not designed to be replaced as normal maintenance.

So instead of a $1500 belt job, you have a $4k+ chain job with the engine out. Or maybe not. But you might.

Unless a chain has a design flaw, it will last the life of the vehicle. Belts are a built in failure that need to be replaced on a regular interval along with all the associated timing components. Not for me, but that's why there are options out there.
 

hrv

Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
180
I'd rather have a timing belt with a scheduled replacement than a "maintenance free" chain.

There are random failures with both systems but with the timing belt you at least know it needs to be changed at a certain time.

With a timing chain, the lifetime is finite but undetermined. They're also more expensive to repair because they're not designed to be replaced as normal maintenance.

So instead of a $1500 belt job, you have a $4k+ chain job with the engine out. Or maybe not. But you might.
My 2007 Honda Accord SE with a 2.4 had a maint free chain....I just traded it in with 386000 on it...No issues with the chain or the entire engine...Ill take the maint free chain anyday...IMO
 
Joined
Dec 24, 2011
Messages
9,903
Location
North Carolina
Unless a chain has a design flaw, it will last the life of the vehicle. Belts are a built in failure that need to be replaced on a regular interval along with all the associated timing components. Not for me, but that's why there are options out there.
Must be my experience with German autos. The belts are not too bad to change.

The chains can be... problematic.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
47,049
Location
New Jersey
Compared to zero for the Tesla, it sounds horrible!
How many miles on the Tesla? Years? You don’t have a comparison yet….

Plenty of stories of people getting obnoxious prices on Tesla repairs, if not lack of availability of parts.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
47,049
Location
New Jersey
I am not too worried about that, because, all the experts say that the Model 3 will self combust well before any issues arise, right? That's what all the data shows, right?
That is certainly a viable path. Reality is that we have only very early knowledge of how cells age and degrade with time. What we do know is that time and temperature both and independently degrade the cells, pressures of small, volatile hydrocarbons rise, and the potential for a number of failure scenarios are more likely.

Time and temperature. No, high mileage over short time models in taxi or courier service do not count.

There are far more serious things that cannot be done out there because of the risks and knowledge gaps associated with long term use of li-ion in aggressive use scenarios. Like safety factors.

It’s serious stuff and should be taken very seriously.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
2,089
Location
Athens, GA
Do I have to answer that question? The shop recommended the service; they did not mention all the parts separately.
They recommended all of that but didn't recommend oil pump(area) seals. Those are way more likely to leak on a J-Series than the crank and cam seals. (IE they are GOING to leak, question is, when....and you have to take the timing area back apart again to replace them.)

And the plenum gaskets are completely reuseable.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
47,049
Location
New Jersey
Unless a chain has a design flaw, it will last the life of the vehicle. Belts are a built in failure that need to be replaced on a regular interval along with all the associated timing components. Not for me, but that's why there are options out there.
That’s just not true. They do wear, and the appropriate approach is to check the degree of timing misalignment regularly. A replacement chain or an offset woodruff key is the appropriate repair. And before that we need to consider tensioners, rails, guides, sprockets, etc.

Just because nobody talks about it, doesn’t mean it’s not an appropriate repair, at least for true long lasting vehicles that are kept and operated for hundreds of thousands of miles.

I'd rather have a timing belt with a scheduled replacement than a "maintenance free" chain.

There are random failures with both systems but with the timing belt you at least know it needs to be changed at a certain time.

With a timing chain, the lifetime is finite but undetermined. They're also more expensive to repair because they're not designed to be replaced as normal maintenance.

So instead of a $1500 belt job, you have a $4k+ chain job with the engine out. Or maybe not. But you might.
You’ve got a point assuming that quality parts are used. You know you’ve re-baselined to have all components’ timing set correctly and everything right.

As someone who runs vehicles that are over 40 years old with original chains, tensioners, guides, etc., and as someone who has taken many of these old cars well over 200k miles, I certainly appreciate that chains can be long lived. But that doesn’t mean that tensioners, guides, sprockets, and chains don’t fail. Plenty of examples out there.

There are pros and cons to both approaches.



Frankly, given the cost of new vehicles, talking or complaining about a $1k timing belt, or $3k of maintenance for something that will go many more miles after actually doing a repair, seems silly. Especially for the utility that a vehicle like an odyssey offers. It would take what, three teslas to meet the same capacity of one odyssey?
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
5,871
Location
northern Az where the Antelope play
Frankly, given the cost of new vehicles, talking or complaining about a $1k timing belt, or $3k of maintenance for something that will go many more miles after actually doing a repair, seems silly. Especially for the utility that a vehicle like an odyssey offers. It would take what, three teslas to meet the same capacity of one odyssey?

Would a Sienna at 6 years and 125k miles need $3k in "normal" expected maintenance repairs? Sienna seems like a valid direct comparison vehicle.
 
Joined
Aug 30, 2004
Messages
25,223
Location
CA
Would a Sienna at 6 years and 125k miles need $3k in "normal" expected maintenance repairs? Sienna seems like a valid direct comparison vehicle.
Probably not, unless yours develops the somewhat common timing cover leak.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
47,049
Location
New Jersey
Would a Sienna at 6 years and 125k miles need $3k in "normal" expected maintenance repairs? Sienna seems like a valid direct comparison vehicle.
Given that our close friends bought a sienna at the same time we got our odyssey…. I’d say that if not $3k in repairs, then certainly a lot of failed parts and leaks.

You need to dissociate the timing belt items from the others as well. Alternator failure? Oil leak? A number of other items on the list?

The timing belt was a normal expected maintenance, not the other $2k of work.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
Messages
27,022
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
My niece's '15 Odyssey EX-L hit 125K and was time for a major service. @The Critic offered to help, but ultimately took it to a good shop in Santa Cruz, CA where she is staying. The alternator took a dump; it was time to move. The VC gaskets were shot; oil was everywhere on the engine passenger side.
Wendy used my old Tundra to shuffle the kids around. Everybody loves (wants) this truck...
Timing Belt Service
Alternator
Valve Cover and Plenum Gaskets
Radiator Hoses
Serpentine Belt
Thermostat
Right Side Engine Mount
Tensioner Assembly
Crankshaft Seal
Camshaft Seal
Coolant and Oil

Used OEM parts as much as possible. $3,100 all in.
I am starting to think our Tesla is a better way to go...
The Honda dealer here charges 1K for the timing belt change inc all parts and serpentine belt and labor. It is not a difficult job on these 5 hrs if you run into the usual rust belt crap 3 hrs if its clean like where you live.

The alternator is putting out low voltage in this case probably due to oil soaked brushes. this is how I would do this job (not anymore I am almost 64 and don't work as much as I used to) and why.

Timing belt with all OE parts and serpentine belt inc labor $700
Alternator, test and clean with new OE brushes $80, replace other parts additional if needed.
Valve adjustment inc gaskets VC/plenum $500
R/side mount cost of mount (it is either a $500 or $50 one) + $80 labor
Tensioner, labor inc with timing belt job, cost of tensioner cost unknown but the OE unit Honda 31170-RV0-A01 Auto Tensioner is over $300
Cam seals, leave them alone if there is no leaks or weeping.
Crank seal $7 labor inc with the job. there have been revisions to the original so yes replace it,
Hoses only if soft spots or damage.
Thermostat, if engine temp normal leave it.
Spool valves clean, gasket/seal replace inc screen if used, some have them others don't same year and model. $50
Check for screen and replace oil filter pad gasket/seal. I wouldn't charge for that its only 3 bolts IIRC and right there. It seems Honda used screens randomly, I have seen them in both both spool valves and filter pads, filter pads only, spools only all on VCM engines of the same year, it is a good idea to replace them, they are part of the seal which is only a few bucks.
PCV valve inc just the cost of the valve about $20

Total with parts 2K or less inc valve adjustment.


 

JeffKeryk

Thread starter
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
8,807
Location
Los Gatos, CA
Thanks to all who posted. As my niece is a single Mom with 2 sets of twin girls, I am thankful to get this work completed.
Her wonderful Odyssey has served them well and she depends on it to "keep the wheels on."
Wendy and the girls are a bright spot in my life. All good.
 
Joined
Aug 30, 2004
Messages
25,223
Location
CA
Thanks to all who posted. As my niece is a single Mom with 2 sets of twin girls, I am thankful to get this work completed.
Her wonderful Odyssey has served them well and she depends on it to "keep the wheels on."
Wendy and the girls are a bright spot in my life. All good.
Sorry Jeff, but I have a feeling you will be doing the alternator job again…
 
Top