2010 Fusion 3.0 Oil Leaks

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A long-time friend of mine has a 2010 Fusion with the 3.0 Duratec V6 as his only family car. Unfortunately, it leaks a lot of oil.

Last year, I replaced the oil pan for him since the oil pan threads were stripped out. Although this made the car leak less, it still leaks a considerable amount of oil....mostly from the spaghetti-looking Timing Cover Gaskets.

I think this particular Ford is the only Ford that I have ever worked on in my life. A few people have informed me that it is possible to reseal the timing cover, valve cover and oil pan (again) without engine removal, but it will be challenging.

Here is the list of parts that I think will be needed for the job. If I am missing anything, please let me know.
3W4Z6710DAGasket - Oil Pan

3M4Z6020BA
Gasket - Cylinder Front Cover
3M4Z6020AAGasket - Cylinder Front Cover
3M4Z6020CAGasket - Cylinder Front Cover
F5AZ6700ASeal Assy - Crankshaft Oil - Front
9L8Z6584AGasket
9L8Z6584BGasket
9L8Z6C527AGasket (qty: 6)
9L8Z9E936AGasket
9L8Z9H486BGasket
GB5Z8620ADriving Belt
F5RZ6A340BBOLT - FLANGED HEX.
XW4Z9448ADGasket - Exhaust Manifold

Should I go with OE or Fel-Pro gaskets? On Asian imports, Fel-Pro rubber gaskets are junk. But again, I have no experience with domestics.

Any help, tips or suggestions for this job are appreciated. And if I should just run away since this job will be outside of my skillset, feel free to be blunt. Thanks.
 
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He must have used that **** synthetic oil. It causes leaks.


Man, sealing that motor up without pulling it is going to be a mission. You guys are going to have some Bro-time for sure.
Fel-pro gaskets are OK. I like OE for typically better fitment.

You're a good friend, man!
 
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The Critic

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He must have used that **** synthetic oil. It causes leaks.


Man, sealing that motor up without pulling it is going to be a mission. You guys are going to have some Bro-time for sure.
Fel-pro gaskets are OK. I like OE for typically better fitment.

You're a good friend, man!
Do you think I will be better off pulling the engine? I am not too familiar with Ford's so the least-invasive approach would be preferred, but I would be happy to drop the motor out if it results in a higher-quality and less painful repair.
 
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Sure it’s not the rear valve cover gasket? Our previous 2009 had the 3.0 and I did a couple rounds of Pennzoil high mileage and that seemed to help a lot
 
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I absolutely cringe at the thought of pulling timing covers on chain-equipped transverse V6's, especially the DOHC variety (they're typically much larger and more awkward to get in/out).

I used to own a Duratec 3.0 V6 in a Mazda Tribute and I don't remember it being terribly cramped, but how the engine is packaged in a Fusion I have no idea. I'd examine it thoroughly and get a game plan together with lots of research (especially from folks that have done it) before attempting it. Fusion (or similar platform) specific forums would be good start.

I know this isn't terribly helpful info. In my own personal experience, I've never had issues with Fel-Pro gaskets regardless of application (foreign / domestic).
 
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Do you think I will be better off pulling the engine? I am not too familiar with Ford's so the least-invasive approach would be preferred, but I would be happy to drop the motor out if it results in a higher-quality and less painful repair.
I saw the exhaust manifold gasket part numbers. That's going to be tight accessing them. I have seen techs dropping the cradle of Explorers for water pump changes so they have complete access to the front of the engine. It might be worth investigating if you guys have access to a lift.

The first thing I would do though is dye the engine and pinpoint the leaks. Valve covers are probably a given, but while there, be sure to check/torque the camshaft bolt caps. Do some research on those as they can loosen over time.
 
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I saw the exhaust manifold gasket part numbers. That's going to be tight accessing them. I have seen techs dropping the cradle of Explorers for water pump changes so they have complete access to the front of the engine. It might be worth investigating if you guys have access to a lift.

The first thing I would do though is dye the engine and pinpoint the leaks. Valve covers are probably a given, but while there, be sure to check/torque the camshaft bolt caps. Do some research on those as they can loosen over time.
The later Duratec 3.5L+ are a completely different engine than the old 3.0L Duratecs, the latter of which was never in an Explorer. The 3.0L Duratec has the water pump driven off the front cam, externally, on the rear side of the engine.

But I would certainly agree with the above-- make absolutely sure that's where it's leaking before you embark on a job like this! I would also make sure you tackle any inexpensive intermediate parts you uncover/remove, that would be handy to change now, but not later.
 
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I saw the exhaust manifold gasket part numbers. That's going to be tight accessing them. I have seen techs dropping the cradle of Explorers for water pump changes so they have complete access to the front of the engine. It might be worth investigating if you guys have access to a lift.

The first thing I would do though is dye the engine and pinpoint the leaks. Valve covers are probably a given, but while there, be sure to check/torque the camshaft bolt caps. Do some research on those as they can loosen over time.
Link to said cam-cap video:

 
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The later Duratec 3.5L+ are a completely different engine than the old 3.0L Duratecs, the latter of which was never in an Explorer. The 3.0L Duratec has the water pump driven off the front cam, externally, on the rear side of the engine.

But I would certainly agree with the above-- make absolutely sure that's where it's leaking before you embark on a job like this! I would also make sure you tackle any inexpensive intermediate parts you uncover/remove, that would be handy to change now, but not later.
Yeah, I know that. My suggestion was an example that it might be a better option given the intended scope of repair.
 
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Link to said cam-cap video:


The later VVT engines (like the one in OP's Fusion) didn't have this issue, to my knowledge.

Look up TSB 06-3-5 (Ford). I think there was a subsequent Mazda TSB that covered up to some 2008 vehicles, but nothing that was VVT equipped.
 
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Yeah, I know that. My suggestion was an example that it might be a better option given the intended scope of repair.
My mistake, lots of folks confuse the two.

I have no idea if the subframe coming down would help with accessing the front cover, but with a quick look under the car, one should be able to tell. But dropping the subframe has its own set of challenges.

Regardless, having access to a lift can never hurt during a repair like this, especially if OP is contemplating removing the engine.
 
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I have no idea if the subframe coming down would help with accessing the front cover, but with a quick look under the car, one should be able to tell. But dropping the subframe has its own set of challenges.

Yeah, the first challenge I think of is rust. Although being out in Cali, they may not have to deal with corrosion like we do. Imagine working on a rust-free 10+ year old cah.

I'm not seeing a lot of videos out there on cradle removal for 3.0's. I just watched a vid of a guy dropping a subframe on the 2.3 equipped car, but kept the drivetrain in the vehicle.
 

The Critic

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Sure it’s not the rear valve cover gasket? Our previous 2009 had the 3.0 and I did a couple rounds of Pennzoil high mileage and that seemed to help a lot
The left side of the timing cover is definitely leaking; I verified that when I replaced the pan.

The later VVT engines (like the one in OP's Fusion) didn't have this issue, to my knowledge.

Look up TSB 06-3-5 (Ford). I think there was a subsequent Mazda TSB that covered up to some 2008 vehicles, but nothing that was VVT equipped.
Looks like they still do: https://f01.justanswer.com/apjp02/fee6d1e7-d33a-4f45-b73d-860be9fc7415_1.pdf

Yeah, the first challenge I think of is rust. Although being out in Cali, they may not have to deal with corrosion like we do. Imagine working on a rust-free 10+ year old cah.

I'm not seeing a lot of videos out there on cradle removal for 3.0's. I just watched a vid of a guy dropping a subframe on the 2.3 equipped car, but kept the drivetrain in the vehicle.
Yeah, this is a CA car that has lived in the valley. It has zero rust.

Not to take this too far off-topic, but here's a short clip of my FIL's 08 Camry after its recent engine and P/S repairs. There is zero rust anywhere:

I guess I will just have to get a short-term subscription to Ford service info and see what the job involves.
 
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If equipped with EGR you are missing EGR valve gaskets. I have done a few, not a bad job. If that has the water pump driven by a belt off the back of the front bank exhaust camshaft, the oil seal and the gasket for the seal mounting plate like to leak as well. New plate comes with the seal installed. You need a special tool to remove and install the drive pulley that goes on to the end of the cam. I usually do a new pulley as they are stamped steel and get a little loose if installed more than 2-3 times. Be generous with the RTV where the heads, block and timing cover come together. OE gaskets only. Also, unless you feel the need to replace the oil pan gasket again there is no need to remove the oil pan. Honestly isnt really any labor overlap between the timing cover and the pan. I like right stuff black in that application, pick up some Motorcraft metal surface prep wipes and gasket remover.
 
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The engine is pretty straight forward to remove, Easier than the 2GR-FE you just did!!

Remove the Subframe & the engine will hang on the on the 2 end mounts, Then you can use your powertrain jack to remove the engine.

I likely wouldn't drop the engine for this repair like I would a 3.5L. But....I've been waffling back and forth on a few projects lately on whether pulling an engine is easier than in-framing the repair.

Had a rash of '14-'17 GM (4.3L/5.3L/6.2L) Trucks/SUV's needing Oil Pumps for Flow Control Solenoid Stuck Off DTC's. Did about 4 In-Frame & 5 Engine-Out.
About the same time wise, But disturbed more components doing the Engine-Out method. While I didn't have any issues with theses jobs either way.....The least evasive procedure is usually best.
 

AutoMechanic

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He isn’t alone mine is leaking too. It wasn’t leaking around the timing cover when I replaced the valve cover gaskets last year now it is unfortunately. I hope I don’t have to pull the engine especially since I can’t do any work at work without a repair order and paying for parts from there. I read most people just let it leak and keep an eye on the oil level but the burning smell I hate. I like Fel Pro gaskets. With it being Ford who knows if you can still get original or not especially with the way things have been lately.
 
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Remove engine as it is easier out of the vehicle and do a complete reseal. Money and time well spent. Once these start leaking they can be a nightmare. Change PCV always with leaks
 
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