2003 Honda Accord Running for Nearly a Million Miles

Joined
Nov 16, 2002
Messages
36,475
Location
NJ

"I have learned (at least for this car) that some parts really need to be replaced with OEM parts," Kilmer told The Drive. "I've used OEM parts for: front lower ball joints, clutch master and slave cylinders, coil packs, wheel bearings, engine mounts. I've used other OEM parts here and there, but those are parts I'm not willing to compromise on this car. [I've heard] too many horror stories of people neglecting to replace the belt or using a cheap belt and having it snap usually causing engine destruction."

"Because he drives so much and changes oil so often, he switched to extended-life oil and filters, which he changes every 15,000 miles. (He still uses the recommended oil weight, though.) Kilmer also uses Redline transmission fluid (a well-regarded aftermarket brand), which he changes every 100,000 miles, and a serviceable K&N air filter serviced twice annually. They're buy-it-once items for most people, though Kilmer had to get a second at 686,000 miles."

"That said, the miles are still taking their toll. Kilmer has to add a quart of oil every 5,000 miles or so, and the V6 has recently developed a misfire. A compression test showed cylinder one is shot; its exhaust valve no longer seals properly."
 
extended-life oil and filters, which he changes every 15,000 miles
has to add a quart of oil every 5,000 miles or so, and the V6 has recently developed a misfire. A compression test showed cylinder one is shot; its exhaust valve no longer seals properly
Will people blame his oil change intervals for those ? Some will ! 🙄
 
All of these million mile cars are well taken cared for. Almost all vehicles can reach that million mile mark as long all are well maintained and not abused. I'm not so much of a traveler so all of my well maintained vehicles (including the feared not so dependable Jaguar as others think, :ROFLMAO: ) can reach that million mile mark.
 
Last edited:
I think anyone who maintains a vehicle that long, has kept a record of what all parts and repairs cost. That would be interesting to see. With a car that has gone almost a million miles, I can see how you have bought the car twice. Only difference is now, you have a used up car that needs things replaced that will never get replaced, and has no resale what so ever. Maybe a few parts that haven
t worn out. Like the back seat, rims, or the jack.,,,
 
So, 15,000 mile oil changes, and it got to about a million miles. The exhaust valve failure has nothing to do with his choice on oil.
I think it bears repeating - 15,000 mile oil changes.
980,000 mile life.
A whole lot of people here are going to ignore the OP and your post ! 😂
 
So, 15,000 mile oil changes, and it got to about a million miles. The exhaust valve failure has nothing to do with his choice on oil.

I think it bears repeating - 15,000 mile oil changes.

980,000 mile life.
A million miles in 20 years is an average of 4,200 miles a month, or about 140 miles per day, every day; most certainly highway driving. I wonder how 15K OCIs would have worked if the car was driven 4,200 miles a year with thousands and thousands of short trips.

In this case there are more factors to this car's longevity than simply the 15K OCIs.

Scott
 
What you tend to see is engines that are running constantly last longer than short on/off trips. Whether it's taxi service or highway miles, an engine that is running for an extended period of time is good for it.
 
I don’t know what his compensation package is like but I have to think he would be much better off with something like a Prius pulling much better mpg. Any 4 cylinder car really.
 
I think anyone who maintains a vehicle that long, has kept a record of what all parts and repairs cost. That would be interesting to see. With a car that has gone almost a million miles, I can see how you have bought the car twice. Only difference is now, you have a used up car that needs things replaced that will never get replaced, and has no resale what so ever. Maybe a few parts that haven
t worn out. Like the back seat, rims, or the jack.,,,
My Jetta is only up to 318,000 miles, but the record book for it is starting to fall apart. The engine still does not use any oil.
 
I think anyone who maintains a vehicle that long, has kept a record of what all parts and repairs cost. That would be interesting to see. With a car that has gone almost a million miles, I can see how you have bought the car twice. Only difference is now, you have a used up car that needs things replaced that will never get replaced, and has no resale what so ever. Maybe a few parts that haven
t worn out. Like the back seat, rims, or the jack.,,,
Even if he bought it three or four times, still beats the average person getting, what, ten new cars in that time?
 
A million miles in 20 years is an average of 4,200 miles a month, or about 140 miles per day, every day; most certainly highway driving. I wonder how 15K OCIs would have worked if the car was driven 4,200 miles a year with thousands and thousands of short trips.

In this case there are more factors to this car's longevity than simply the 15K OCIs.

Scott
Of course. Clearly how he drives it matters.

It's more a comment on a couple of recent posts I've seen, ones like, "There is no 10,000 mile oil. That will damage your engine"

Which fails to take into account HOW the car is driven, where the car is driven, what oil is used, and what engine we are talking about.
 
Even if he bought it three or four times, still beats the average person getting, what, ten new cars in that time?
How does it beat buying a new, or newer car every few years? I'm sure the drivers seat is nowhere near what it once was. And I'm sure they only fixed what was necessary to keep the car moving. And ignored all the rest, like dash lights that don't work anymore. Or the dome light, or windows that no longer go up or down, or get stuck up or down. Doors that don't open right. Squeaks, worn out door hinges, speakers that no longer make a sound, heaters that only work occasionally. And paint, that only slightly resembles what it color it used to be. Then the biggie Rust. You know, all the tell tale signs that the car is shot and should be replaced.,,
 
I don’t know what his compensation package is like but I have to think he would be much better off with something like a Prius pulling much better mpg. Any 4 cylinder car really.
HAHA. I calculated how much the previous original owner of my 500,000 mile Sequoia spent on gas during his ownership, and it was over $100,000, or more than double its purchase price.
 
Top