10W20W40

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I have some old Valvoline oil in cardboard cans stamped on top with these visc. numbers. Anyone heard of this type of oil?
 
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Its very, very old, and a collectors item. Save it, or sell it. It is probably from the 1970's...many on here would have used cans just like that 'back in the day'! They used that viscosity designation just to show that the oil would meet the requirements of different 'W' viscosities - it was a 10W-40, but it also met the requirements of a 20W-40 if that visc. was needed.
 
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 Originally Posted By: Tim H.
Would love to see a VOA on that stuff!
Before or after shaking the can? I'd like to see it too. When I was learning the basics of taking care of cars, all oil came in such cans. The big deal was to make sure you got a good can-puncturing spout. The bad ones sealed poorly, and would dribble oil everywhere as soon as you tipped the can to add oil. A good one would hardly ever leak.
 
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My buddy has a similar can. It might even be Valvoline. Unlike now, people didn't know that oil with a winter rating also meets all the viscosity requirements of oil with an inferior winter rating. ;\)
 

ridgerunner

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FYI, I have nearly a full case of this stuff as well as other brands and weights in cans. Anyone interested?
 
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 Quote:
The big deal was to make sure you got a good can-puncturing spout. The bad ones sealed poorly, and would dribble oil everywhere as soon as you tipped the can to add oil. A good one would hardly ever leak.
And, if you didn't push on them just so, the bad ones would also sometimes not puncture properly, then the cardboard sides of the can would collapse - mini Exxon Valdez scenario. \:\(
 
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