10W-30 in new Super Duty Diesel? Not compatible with B5-B20

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My point is you can run the IOLM to 0% with a conventional 10w-30 and still have plenty of reserve. Most posts I have read here and elsewhere owners refuse to trust the IOLM and dump early at some arbitrary mileage, run a syn "because its better". Show me evidence as I'm a realist.
 
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My experience with diesel and 10w-30 can be traced back to my ‘07 6.0 PowerStroke. The rage at the time was 5w-40, I had made 3 consecutive runs with the Shell variant available at the time. Three consecutive UOA's showed higher wear numbers vs. the previously used 15w-40. I then went to 10w-30 and wear numbers immediately subsided. The last run of 5w-40 was drained around 85,000 mi., from that point forward it had only 10w-30 and it was traded in at 225,000 mi. On my current ‘15 6.7.
 

AcuraMDX2014

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The 2019 Super Duty manual uses term Special Operating for conditions mentioned above as Severe Duty. These are the conditions : Diesel Engine- maintenance detail deleted by me. If you operate your vehicle primarily in any of the following conditions, you need to perform extra maintenance as indicated. If you operate your vehicle occasionally under any of these conditions, it is not necessary to perform the extra maintenance. For specific recommendations, see your dealership service advisor or technician. Towing a Trailer or Using a Car-top Carrier Frequent or Extended Idling (Over 10 Minutes Per Hour of Normal Driving) or Frequent Low-speed Operation if your Vehicle is Used for Stationary Operation Frequent Low-speed Operation, Consistent Heavy Traffic Under 25 mph (40 km/h) or Long Rush-hour Traffic Sustained High-speed Driving at Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (Maximum Loaded Weight for Vehicle Operation) Operating in Sustained Ambient Temperatures Below -9°F (-23°C) or Above 100°F (38°C) Operating in Dusty or Sandy Conditions (Such as Unpaved or Dusty Roads) Off-road Operation Using Biodiesel, up to and Including 20% Biodiesel (B20) Using Fuel Other Than Ultra-low Sulfur Diesel Fuel - Vehicles Operated Where Ultra-low Sulfur Diesel Fuel is not Required or Available http://www.fordservicecontent.com/F...ilteringEnabled=False&userMarket=USA[/img]
 
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Originally Posted by roadrunner1
My experience with diesel and 10w-30 can be traced back to my ‘07 6.0 PowerStroke. The rage at the time was 5w-40, I had made 3 consecutive runs with the Shell variant available at the time. Three consecutive UOA's showed higher wear numbers vs. the previously used 15w-40. I then went to 10w-30 and wear numbers immediately subsided. The last run of 5w-40 was drained around 85,000 mi., from that point forward it had only 10w-30 and it was traded in at 225,000 mi. On my current ‘15 6.7.
I would believe that. Base-oil viscosity, not just HTHS viscosity, matters for wear protection. 5W-40 usually has the lowest base-oil viscosity and this could increase the wear. A conventional 15W-40 will have the highest base-oil viscosity and lowest wear. 10W-30 would fall in the middle. Chevron has a very nice brochure about their Group II oils. It's very informative indeed. One of its pages is dedicated to the base-oil viscosity. They explicitly and very confidently state that:
  • "Heavier base-oil viscosity improves performance"
  • "In HDMO (HDEO), wear decreases as (base-oil) viscosity increases (from 5W to 10W to 15W)"
  • "Commercial proof: Proof that a heavier base-oil viscosity is critical to wear control."
Therefore, they go as far as saying that they have proved the base-oil viscosity to be critical to wear control. They did their tests on a mini traction meter (MTM) using both experimental oils (5W-30, 10W-30, and 15W-30) and commercially available oils (5W-40 and 15W-40). The results were such that the 5W-30 produced more wear than the 10W-30, which in turn produced more wear than the 15W-30. The CJ-4 5W-40 produced more wear than the CJ-4 15W-40. The results are the same for both fresh and sooted oil. [Linked Image from lh3.googleusercontent.com] Here is the full Chevron brochure: Chevron Group II base oils: optimise automotive engine oils
 
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SC
Interesting information in this thread. What I haven't seen is an explanation of why thicker oil (40W) is recommended for B20. I suspect that it is related to the increased regen frequency people usually see with B20 and the resulting fuel dilution. Does anyone know for sure?
 
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WI
Biodiesel in higher percentages doesn't always behave well during fuel injection cycles, especially in modern common rail diesels that operate at 25,000+ PSI fuel rail pressures. Bio will gum up injectors, it causes varnish buildup on injector tips, it leads to sludge throughout the engine and other bad things. I suppose a thicker oil would just provide extra protection when running bio, but for those running B20 or higher regularly I hope they don't do so on a common rail engines, and that they use a more conservative OCI. In general, I think thicker oils tend to be more shear stable, and also better protect critical engine parts when fuel dilution occurs (I guess everyone understands "fuel dilution" refers to the fuel diluting the oil, thus making it thinner and reducing its lubricating properties). The other thing when looking at the snow plow scenario, for example, is that the transmission actually takes more of a beating than the engine. I've seen several F250s overheat and damage their transmissions when plowing people's driveways.
 
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Woodbury
I just purchased a 2020 F-450 6.7 powerstroke. Master Service tech here in Minnesota said all Ford 6.7s come 10w30 motorcraft from factory. In midwest, they recommend 0w40 in the winter months. 10w30 is fine when running a block heater.

I dumped the factory oil and put in Schaeffer's 722 SynShield Ultra 10W30 :
 
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323
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Iowa
I run a 2012 Cummins Ram here in Iowa and use 15W40 year round. Fuel dilution can be a problem in the winter months and bio-diesel doesn't help either. Starting with a higher viscosity gives me comfort. If it's in the manual to use 5W40 or 15W40 then why not use it? I find it is easier to get these viscosity's than 10W30 HDEO.

If it's good enough for the semi's on the road it should work for my truck... (y)
 
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337
Location
Idaho
I run a 2012 Cummins Ram here in Iowa and use 15W40 year round. Fuel dilution can be a problem in the winter months and bio-diesel doesn't help either. Starting with a higher viscosity gives me comfort. If it's in the manual to use 5W40 or 15W40 then why not use it? I find it is easier to get these viscosity's than 10W30 HDEO.

If it's good enough for the semi's on the road it should work for my truck... (y)

You do realize that all OTR OE manufacturers, Paccar, Freightliner, Navistar, Mack & Volvo, have been using 10w30 as factory fill for 5-8 years, right?
 
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323
Location
Iowa
You do realize that all OTR OE manufacturers, Paccar, Freightliner, Navistar, Mack & Volvo, have been using 10w30 as factory fill for 5-8 years, right?

factory fill yes, after that more than likely not... No different than 5W20 FF in my wife's T&C and now nothing but 5W30. Many OEM's play games to achieve fuel mileage standards as discussed in several other threads on here.
 
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