10W-30 in new Super Duty Diesel? Not compatible with B5-B20

Messages
13
Location
Colorado
Is Ford using 10W-30 in new Super Duty diesels? If so this would be wrong oil per Ford when diesel fuels with B5-B20 are used and are the norm in my area at least. Image is from 2019 super duty manual. (was in Spanish--my mistake) [Linked Image] [Linked Image] If so, I will change oil in F-350 diesel to 5W-40 (Rotella T6?, which meets CK-4 and Ford Material Engineering Specification WSS-M2C171-F1, per [img]https://www.enginebuildermag.com/20...et-ford-diesel-engine-oil-specification/[/img]) especially since I'll be towing a lot and very low temperatures are possible for me.
 
Last edited:
Messages
25,681
Location
Upstate NY
I go with 5W40 Delo synthetic CJ-4. And I use Mobil "advanced technology" diesel fuel. I will probably go with Rotella T6 5W40 CK-4 when I am out of Delo CJ-4. I do not believe the Delo 5W40 CK-4 is on the Ford approved list yet.
 
Messages
789
Location
Michigan, USA
I believe they've been using it in the Ford's. I thought I read the new 2020 Ram Cummins was spec'd at 10w30 HDEO. Although most will probably still run an Xw40 weight.
 

AcuraMDX2014

Thread starter
Messages
13
Location
Colorado
Low temperatures in metro Denver tonight are to be 3F, which is barely in the 0F+ range for "Normal Usage" 10W30. I called dealer service department that I purchased the 2019 F-350 diesel from and left a message asking what comes from factory. If they don't know or don't reply I may call another dealer. I don't know where to call from there. I don't plan on driving when its below 10/15F but it could happen. I'm going to pickup a camper in the mountains soon but will delay trip if temperatures are below 0F. Full synthetic doesn't appear to be good choice for engine 1,000 mi. break-in, which I'll pass on my way to pickup camper.
 
Last edited:
Messages
518
Location
California
Originally Posted by bullwinkle
I wonder which 0W40 Ford would recommend? I've seen it in T6, but CK-4 0W40 seems pretty rare.
I can think of only 3 0w40 oils that meet the Ford spec. 1. Kendall SHP arctic 0w40 2. Rotella T6 0w40 3. Amsoil HD SS 0w40 There is also the John Deere 0w40 but I don't think the new CK-4 formula meets the Ford spec.
 
Messages
1,332
Location
oh
Originally Posted by AcuraMDX2014
Low temperatures in metro Denver tonight are to be 3F, which is barely in the 0F+ range for "Normal Usage" 10W30. I called dealer service department that I purchased the 2019 F-350 diesel from and left a message asking what comes from factory. If they don't know or don't reply I may call another dealer. I don't know where to call from there. I don't plan on driving when its below 10/15F but it could happen. I'm going to pickup a camper in the mountains soon but will delay trip if temperatures are below 0F. Full synthetic doesn't appear to be good choice for engine 1,000 mi. break-in, which I'll pass on my way to pickup camper.
10w-30 is what is used as factory fill on the 6.7 PowerStroke
 
Messages
5,324
Location
Paramount, California
Originally Posted by AcuraMDX2014
Is Ford using 10W-30 in new Super Duty diesels? If so this would be wrong oil per Ford when diesel fuels with B5-B20 are used and are the norm in my area at least. Image is from 2019 super duty manual. (was in Spanish--my mistake) [Linked Image] [Linked Image] If so, I will change oil in F-350 diesel to 5W-40 (Rotella T6?, which meets CK-4 and Ford Material Engineering Specification WSS-M2C171-F1, per [img]https://www.enginebuildermag.com/20...et-ford-diesel-engine-oil-specification/[/img]) especially since I'll be towing a lot and very low temperatures are possible for me.
You had already figured this out on your own. Yes, use a CK-4 5W-40 or 15W-40 (thicker oil) if using biodiesel. Having Ford spec would give you peace of mind and warranty coverage, but it probably won't make a bit difference. Use 5W-40 in cold climates or for longer oil-change intervals. My favorite would be a 15W-40, as it provides the thickest base oil for best wear protection for in all conditions including towing, but you can't use it without an oil-pan heater in your area, and the OCI will be a little shorter than with a 5W-40. Delvac/Rotella/Delo/Premium Blue are all good.
 
Messages
1,332
Location
oh
There's no difference between the viscosity's listed in OCI, just follow the IOLM. I doubt your locale has much if any bio blend fuel this time of the year as its the first to gel.
 

AcuraMDX2014

Thread starter
Messages
13
Location
Colorado
Could the 5W-40 be listed as the oil for severe duty versus 15W-40 because severe duty could be for snow plows and colder climates? The only reference that I found in manual for severe duty service mentioned snow plow.
 
Messages
5,324
Location
Paramount, California
Originally Posted by AcuraMDX2014
Could the 5W-40 be listed as the oil for severe duty versus 15W-40 because severe duty could be for snow plows and colder climates? The only reference that I found in manual for severe duty service mentioned snow plow.
No. It's listed as severe duty because it has a synthetic base oil vs. the conventional or synthetic-blend base oils of 15W-40 and 10W-30. Synthetic base oils oxidize (cook) slower than conventional base oils, which helps in severe-duty service, as the oil temperature is higher, which increases the rate of oxidation. Alternatively you can still use a conventional or synthetic-blend oil in severe-duty service but do shorter oil-change intervals (OCI's). Conversely you can do longer OCI's with synthetic oil in normal-duty service than with conventional oil. If the snow plow is said to cause severe duty, it could be because the oil temperatures get high, as the truck is moving too slowly for the cooling system to run efficiently.
 
Messages
915
Location
AR
Severe duty with a snot plow is not because of lack of cooling - it's because of the high load on the engine pushing (normally very heavy) snow, continuously.
 
Messages
5,324
Location
Paramount, California
Originally Posted by tundraotto
Severe duty with a snot plow is not because of lack of cooling - it's because of the high load on the engine pushing (normally very heavy) snow, continuously.
It's true that you need a thicker oil for low-RPM/high-load operations to maintain the minimum oil-film thickness (MOFT) for hydrodynamic lubrication. However, in footnote 1 the manual doesn't mention 15W-40 for severe-duty service, which is even thicker than 5W-40. They specifically recommend a synthetic oil for severe-duty service. In any case severe duty is mostly a combination of high oil temperatures and high load, which are related. High oil temperatures decrease oil life because of faster oxidation. Severe duty is not limited to high loads and/or high temperatures. Below is the full description from the manual. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 6.7L POWER STROKE SERVICE INFORMATION 6.7L POWER STROKE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE, SERVICE PART NUMBERS, FLUID SPECS "Severe" duty conditions include any or any combination of the following: • Excessive idling • Frequent short trips in which the engine is shut-down before reaching full operating temperature • Driving on dusty roads • Driving off-road or in conditions that require 4 wheel drive • Frequent towing or hauling (with the exception of very light loads) • Using biodiesel blends greater than B5 (applies to oil, fuel filters only) As a general rule of thumb, always abide by the "Severe Duty" service schedule if your vehicle is used in any strenuous activity, i.e. is subjected to more rigorous conditions than normal, unladen driving. Engine oil 10W-30 Acceptable viscosity in ambient temps > 0° F Preferred for normal usage 5W-40 Acceptable viscosity in ambient temps > -20° F Trucks using biodiesel should use 15W-40 or 5W-40 Preferred if truck falls under "Severe Duty" service schedule 15W-40 Acceptable viscosity in ambient temps > 20° F Trucks using biodiesel should use 15W-40 or 5W-40 0W-30/0W-40 Acceptable viscosity in all ambient temperatures Recommended in extremely cold conditions only http://www.powerstrokehub.com/6.7-power-stroke-maintenance.html ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Messages
915
Location
AR
Precisely....that's why tractors/bulldozers traditionally use the heavier 15W-40 - not 5W-40. Lots of relatively low-speed, constant loads (why they are also always diesels). The 'thinnies' are always there - but for fuel economy, emissions and anything else - but engine protection first.
 
Last edited:
Messages
1,332
Location
oh
Originally Posted by Gokhan
Originally Posted by tundraotto
Severe duty with a snot plow is not because of lack of cooling - it's because of the high load on the engine pushing (normally very heavy) snow, continuously.
It's true that you need a thicker oil for low-RPM/high-load operations to maintain the minimum oil-film thickness (MOFT) for hydrodynamic lubrication. However, in footnote 1 the manual doesn't mention 15W-40 for severe-duty service, which is even thicker than 5W-40. They specifically recommend a synthetic oil for severe-duty service. In any case severe duty is mostly a combination of high oil temperatures and high load, which are related. High oil temperatures decrease oil life because of faster oxidation. Severe duty is not limited to high loads and/or high temperatures. Here is the full list: "Severe" duty conditions include any or any combination of the following: • Excessive idling • Frequent short trips in which the engine is shut-down before reaching full operating temperature • Driving on dusty roads • Driving off-road or in conditions that require 4 wheel drive • Frequent towing or hauling (with the exception of very light loads) • Using biodiesel blends greater than B5 (applies to oil, fuel filters only) Engine oil 10W-30 Acceptable viscosity in ambient temps > 0° F Preferred for normal usage 5W-40 Acceptable viscosity in ambient temps > -20° F Trucks using biodiesel should use 15W-40 or 5W-40 Preferred if truck falls under "Severe Duty" service schedule 15W-40 Acceptable viscosity in ambient temps > 20° F Trucks using biodiesel should use 15W-40 or 5W-40 0W-30/0W-40 Acceptable viscosity in all ambient temperatures Recommended in extremely cold conditions only http://www.powerstrokehub.com/6.7-power-stroke-maintenance.html
While the above is for the 3.0 PowerStroke, the 6.7 specs concerning duty service is similar, although oil specs are by far different. I'm not buying into the syn vs. conventional argument as to longer OCI. I have a ‘15 6.7 with 125,000 mi. That has had nothing but 10w-30 since it left the Louisville assembly plant. It's my work truck, towing, hauling heavy, running in 90F plus heat during summer months, and short tripping during winter. UOA data doesn't show my regimen of letting the IOLM go to 0% prior to changing oil is detrimental to the health of my truck. At one point I did have elevated FE, it ended up being attributed to Enerburn fuel additive as when I discontinued its use Fe decreased to roughly 20 ppm at 10,000 mi. OCI. I also own a 3.0 PowerStroke and plan on running it out until the IOLM goes to 0% also, I guess I'm rogue.
 
Messages
5,324
Location
Paramount, California
Originally Posted by roadrunner1
While the above is for the 3.0 PowerStroke, the 6.7 specs concerning duty service is similar, although oil specs are by far different.
I've updated the specs for the 6.7 and corrected the link.
Quote
I'm not buying into the syn vs. conventional argument as to longer OCI. I have a ‘15 6.7 with 125,000 mi. That has had nothing but 10w-30 since it left the Louisville assembly plant. It's my work truck, towing, hauling heavy, running in 90F plus heat during summer months, and short tripping during winter. UOA data doesn't show my regimen of letting the IOLM go to 0% prior to changing oil is detrimental to the health of my truck. At one point I did have elevated FE, it ended up being attributed to Enerburn fuel additive as when I discontinued its use Fe decreased to roughly 20 ppm at 10,000 mi. OCI. I also own a 3.0 PowerStroke and plan on running it out until the IOLM goes to 0% also, I guess I'm rogue.
Most people on BITOG will tell you that you can run longer OCI's with synthetic than with conventional or conversely shorter OCI's with conventional than with synthetic. Regarding OLM's correct me if I'm wrong, but they only take into account how the vehicle is driven, not the actual oil condition. In particular they don't take into account the type or quality of the oil used. Even though there is an oxidation-resistance test (Volvo T-13) in API CK-4, the quality of the base oil as well as the amount of the antioxidant used varies from oil to oil, and you will usually see a difference between conventional and synthetic oil in terms of the actual oil life.
 
Top