0w-5 and 0w-10 in the new hybrids

Messages
188
Location
Charleston, SC
I cant believe it, but I saw it. In the new 3 cylinder .8 liter hybrids, they're using 0w-5 and 0w-10 oil in it with excellent results. Didn't get a brand on it though..
 
Messages
1,381
Location
Southeast Kentucky
quote:
Originally posted by Durrr: I cant believe it, but I saw it. In the new 3 cylinder .8 liter hybrids, they're using 0w-5 and 0w-10 oil in it with excellent results. Didn't get a brand on it though..
Maybe Singer??!! [LOL!]
 
Messages
1,381
Location
Southeast Kentucky
Seriously, I went to 'howstuffworks' and did a little research. Some hybrids shut the engine off and use the electric motor only at low speed and idle situations, then restart the engine above a certain speed (15-25 mph). With multiple engine starts in a single trip, these engines need quick start-up lubrication to survive and being a 'green' vehicle you know they will use thin oil. They are pretty fascinating pieces of machinery.
 
Messages
1,381
Location
Southeast Kentucky
quote:
Originally posted by seotaji: $3-10k for new batteries.
They have an 8 year/100K mile warranty and a projected life span of at least 200K so shouldn't be an issue, at least for the original owner.
 
Messages
7,786
Location
Oklahoma
The batteries are good at low speeds and around the city and also use regenerative brakes, can charge the batteries when applied. However, from all that I've read, the motor will have to run when cruising highway speeds. So, doesn't that mean the engine will be running about the same as a normal car? And they want you to use an X-10 weighted oil? Wow, pretty thin and not much protection.
 
Messages
8,711
Location
Nothern USA
I am sure they thought of that. They likely pulled some tricks like a strong oil pump with a good ADBV built in for all the starts, maybe even a accumulator.
 
Messages
3,094
Location
Metro Detroit
quote:
Originally posted by Virtuoso: What is in those batteries? It's not one bigarse liquid acid bath waiting for a good rear-ending is it?
The current hybrids use nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries, which are commonly used in rechargeable batteries for cell phones and such. They came out as an improvement to the nickel cadmium rechargable batteries. The biggest advantage is that they don't need to be run down completely before recharging for the best life span, like NiCad do. So you won't get an acid bath in a hybrid car.
 
Messages
1,381
Location
Southeast Kentucky
quote:
Originally posted by Schmoe: The batteries are good at low speeds and around the city and also use regenerative brakes, can charge the batteries when applied. However, from all that I've read, the motor will have to run when cruising highway speeds. So, doesn't that mean the engine will be running about the same as a normal car? And they want you to use an X-10 weighted oil? Wow, pretty thin and not much protection.
There are 2 types of hybrid cars, parallel and series. Parallel is the more common where the gas engine can run the car part of the time, using the electric motor only part time or as an extra boost of power when passing or accelerating. So the city mpg rating is actually better since the gas engine isn't running all the time. Diesel-electric freight locomotives are series, as the engine never turns the wheels, it only powers the generator. Here is some good info: http://auto.howstuffworks.com/hybrid-car.htm
 
Messages
302
Location
Chicago
quote:
Originally posted by mikemc:
quote:
Originally posted by seotaji: $3-10k for new batteries.
They have an 8 year/100K mile warranty and a projected life span of at least 200K so shouldn't be an issue, at least for the original owner.

LOL! "8 year/100K mile warranty" translates to "2.5 year warranty" for people who drive like me. My friend recently had a Prius as a rental car. Very impressive. But I can't afford to have to replace a $3000 battery at 150,000 miles, especially since the kind of MPG I'd get would only tempt me to drive even more!
 
Messages
4,872
Location
MN
quote:
Originally posted by Virtuoso: What is in those batteries? It's not one bigarse liquid acid bath waiting for a good rear-ending is it?
No they use NiMH and lithium Ion batteries. Believe it or not the Civic Hybrid uses 120 D-cell batteries. Others use similar setups. They are cheap, because they are widely produced. Unfortunately this doesn't translate to replacement prices. [Roll Eyes] -T
 
Messages
3,593
Location
Outside smalltown, IL
quote:
Originally posted by T-Keith:
quote:
Originally posted by Virtuoso: What is in those batteries? It's not one bigarse liquid acid bath waiting for a good rear-ending is it?
No they use NiMH and lithium Ion batteries. Believe it or not the Civic Hybrid uses 120 D-cell batteries. Others use similar setups. They are cheap, because they are widely produced. Unfortunately this doesn't translate to replacement prices. [Roll Eyes] -T

As someone who's worked a bit with assorted battery packs over the years, and designed few charging ciucuits, I'd call this A Bad Thing™ [Wink] It's really hard to control the charge in a single cell of the pack and cell life suffers because of this. And wait until corrosion starts to appear on the multiple connections involved. Ugh. I see a new industry just to rebuild these packs and the charging circuits.
 
Messages
202
Location
sokali
quote:
Originally posted by T-Keith:
quote:
Originally posted by Virtuoso: What is in those batteries? It's not one bigarse liquid acid bath waiting for a good rear-ending is it?
No they use NiMH and lithium Ion batteries. Believe it or not the Civic Hybrid uses 120 D-cell batteries. Others use similar setups. They are cheap, because they are widely produced. Unfortunately this doesn't translate to replacement prices. [Roll Eyes] -T

Can you show me about the 120 D cells?
 
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