03 f150 2wd

Messages
873
Location
Fredericton
Well, what are you running for tires? All season crap (note the bias)? That would do it right there. And every truck can benefit with a bit of weight and judicious applications of the throttle. John.
 
I see you are in NC. I doubt your willing to go out and buy snow tires for the little bit of snow that you guys get there. Considering a good set of snow tires (your best bet) is probably otu of the question, I would add some weight. Do not put this behind the rear axle because it will remove weight from the steering and braking tires (front). The front of the box should be the best place. A couple hundred pounds should be more than enough. I will still maintain that a good set of snow tires is the best for winter. I rarely use 4wd in the winter and my two previous trucks weren't 4wd. I never added any weight and never had any problems with SW New York State winters. Other guys with there super swamper tires have to add weight to their trucks while my wimpy looking snow tires will run circles around them in the snow and ice.
 
Messages
13,132
Location
By Detroit
quote:
Originally posted by crimsontide: what can you do to keep the rear tires from spinning and the rear end from slifdding around in the snow.......should i try adding weight or what??
Is your rear end limited slip or a one legger? I run four bags of play sand behind the rear axle in my '95 F150. Never had any problem with steering. The sand may come in handy if you get stuck. Throw some under the spinning tire(s). Got the wife's Aerostar one legger out that way last winter.
 
Messages
2,569
Location
College Dorm...
quote:
Originally posted by crimsontide: the tires are the factory bf goodrich radial long trail t/a
And there's your problem...switch to some better tires and you'll notice a world of difference!
 

crimsontide

Thread starter
Messages
284
Location
Charlotte, NC
as far as adding weight to my pickup......how much and put it behind the cab or at the end of the bed??? i see there were 2 different opinions on this.....
 
Messages
2,513
Location
Richmond, VA
I put the weight at the back of the bed. 200 pounds of sand should work fine. I used winter tires on all 4 wheels when I had my 1974 Chevy C-10 and they lasted better than the new Goodyears that came on my 2001 Dodge Ram I have now. Winter tread tires are also better in the summertime when you go to the dump or get in a little mud. Narrow tires go better in the snow, so don't get oversize tires. [Cheers!]
 
Messages
1,315
Location
Basehor, KS
All pickup rear ends are pretty light unless they carry a load full time. Recommend putting the weight right above the rear axle. I used around 200 lbs and would add if things still didn't feel right. That worked best for me. My wife put concrete patio blocks in the trunk of her cars, so she got extra weight and also still had trunk room left. You could go with larger concrete blocks if you wanted. They are weather-proof, unlike bags of play sand. Having some sand helps out if you get stuck, though. When you decide to replace the tires, look carefully at their snow performance ratings and choose accordingly. My feeling is that in Charlotte you are OK with adding weight and let your tires run their course until they are worn out/not serviceable.
 
Messages
244
Location
South Dakota
The Long trails are a pretty decent all round tire, despite what some will have you believe. Add some weight, but make sure to secure it down. The front of the bed is the best place. Simply put, in the even of a crash those bags will become a projectile and can penetrate the back of the cab window, and in some cases the metal below the cab window if they are placed any other place other than the front of the bed. I learned this lesson the hard way, and am lucky to be alive. Under no curcumstances should you ever use a patio block, cement blocks, etc, as they will do way more damage in the even of an accident! I've seen patio blocks go thru car doors and panels that where loaded in the back of a pickup for better traction.
 
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